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Taki Ochi (Taizan Ha)

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This is a piece of genre Koten from the Taizan Ha School.

History (Riley Kelly Lee):

Cascading Waterfall Piece

The word 'waterfall' in Japanese is taki. As with many honkyoku, there are many versions of this piece. The complete title of this version is "Betsuden Takiochi no Kyoku" (Special Transmission of the Cascading Waterfall Piece). Classified as a 'secret' piece, it is one of the last honkyoku taught in the Chikuho ryu or lineage and is transmitted
only to 'initiated' members of the lineage. Waterfalls are frequently the focal point of temples or temple complexes in Japan. Performed on a 2.6 shaku length flute.

Taki Ochi (Taizan Ha) appears on the following albums

AlbumShakuhachiKotoShamisen
Koten Shakuhachi Gaku Zen Shu - 2 Takeuchi Chiko

Meianji Shoden Shakuhachi Honkyoku Shu 01 Yoshimura sôshin Fuan

Mountain Valley Riley Kelly Lee

    Cascading Waterfall Piece

    The word 'waterfall' in Japanese is taki. As with many honkyoku, there are many versions of this piece. The complete title of this version is "Betsuden Takiochi no Kyoku" (Special Transmission of the Cascading Waterfall Piece). Classified as a 'secret' piece, it is one of the last honkyoku taught in the Chikuho ryu or lineage and is transmitted
    only to 'initiated' members of the lineage. Waterfalls are frequently the focal point of temples or temple complexes in Japan. Performed on a 2.6 shaku length flute.

Myoan Sanjunana Sei Tanikita Muchiku Shu - 1 Tanikita Muchiku Roan

Reibo - Fukeshu-Shakuhachi Fujiyoshi Etsuzan

    In life, there are happy moments, and painful ones. This is compared to the process through which a small brook widens to become a river, and eventually reaches the ocean.

Shakuhachi Suiso Furuya Teruo

Sokkan Taniguchi Yoshinobu

    The spirit of this song is as simple as the title. Become a waterfall! Maybe a grand waterfall with the huge sound of water crashing down on rocks and flowing in a wild rage. Perhaps a small stream running down the mountain quietly, sometimes swiftly and sometimes slowly, bouncing off small rocks and hugging slimy green shadows to merge with another stream.

    It is necessary to practice playing this piece at a quick pace so that you can develop a smooth technique and also to help bypass any "thinking". One should play this song over and over so it feels and flows out naturally. Its tempo and rhythm are the main aspects to focus on.

Sui Zen - Blowing Meditation on the Shakuhachi - 03 Ronnie Nyogetsu Reishin Seldin

    This famous classical honkyoku is in the Japanese tradition of art that portrays the spirit of nature; what Westeners call program music. It portrays a waterfall that grows in three sections from two meandering, trickling streams to a strong torrent, and eventually empties into a larger body and finds repose. When playing it, one can become the waterfall. Some teachers of sumie, traditional Japanese ink painting with a brush, playa recording of this piece, and other shakuhachi music while their students paint, to provide the proper meditative mood and inspiration.

    Jin Nyodo received this piece from Horiguchi Zeki of the Fudai-ji tradition in Hamamatsu, but Jin Nyodo's version has been observed to actually differ from Zeki's. One legend states that Takiochi was originally composed at Ryugenji, a komuso temple, situated at the base of the Asahi Waterfall. It is located south if IzuOhito, and was famous as a great waterfall, but was really only 33 jo high. One jo equals 10 shaku, so it is only about 3.31 yards high. The temple no longer exists, but the site is still associated with music; the temple building was converted to a workshop in which the Yamaha musical instrument empire began.

    There also is a Kinko Ryu piece called Takioshi or "waterfall" that has many melodies in common and coinciding structural points, but a different mood. It appears to have been taken from a koto piece, Takitoshi, which also means waterfall, upon which these shakuhachi versions are based.

    The first section introduces the feeling of two small burbling, laughing streams; the second section repeats the first half of the first section, giving a sense of increased excitement...in speed and force until it becomes a "white water" cascade. The third section, played strongly in the high range, portrays the greatest force. At the end, the music conveys the peaceful union with a large strong body of water. It is played here on a 2.4 length shakuhachi.


The International Shakuhachi Society - 2018