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Daha

打波

This is a piece of genre Koten from the Dokyoku / Chikushinkai School.

History (Tajima Tadashi):

Known as Pounding Drum Piece the title conveys the incessant strivings involved in spiritual practice. The fast tempo and forceful breathing is said to indicate manifestations of the mind under strict discipline.

Daha appears on the following albums

AlbumShakuhachiKotoShamisen
Bamboo In Zen Alcvin Ryuzen Ramos


Empty Sky - Yearning for the Bell Volume 3 Riley Kelly Lee

    Daha / Pounding Wave is a prayer for the will power or determination to achieve one's highest aspirations. There are times when strong, intense, and unyielding determinations, like the ocean waves pounding at the cliff face, is appropriate. Other times, gentle, patient and unceasing will power, like the quiet waves lapping at the base of the cliff, gives better results. This piece reflects both the Yin and the Yang of will power.


Floating Clouds Michael Chikuzen Gould

    A steady, pulsating rhythm is produced by the breath to imitate the natural sound of waves striking the shore as the tide comes in. Another explanation is that the will tries to transcend the realm of the material world, and its ambitions and desires are reflected through this pulsation.


Home is Now Horacio Curti

In Dead Earnest Part 2 Ishikawa Toshimitsu

Japan - Splendour of the Shakuhachi Okada Michiaki

    The origin of this piece is unclear, but it is usually interpreted as meaning da-to strike, and ha-to tear or break. According to this interpretation the objective of this piece is that all of the desires or worries of the common people will be overcome, and nothingness and all-ness will be transcended to reach a natural state of resignation.

    The five part form of this piece is A-B-A1-B-C. The techniques used in this work which make it diverse are an intricate smoothness in the sound and delicate movement.

Japanese Bamboo Flute Richard Stagg

Japanese Traditional Shakuhachi Yokoyama Katsuya

    Origin unknown. Shirabe (melody) by a mendicant priest standing at a crossroads.


Japon Yokoyama Katsuya

    Breaking of Waves

    Just as that of Koku, this term has a spiritual resonance: the breaking of waves signifies the will to break all desires of terrestrial life in order to attain the state of Sunyata. This force of will is manifested by the rapidity of the movement and by the forceful attack together with the sound of the breathing.

Katsuya Yokoyama Plays Shakuhachi - 2 Yokoyama Katsuya


Poeme du Bambou Marco Lienhard

Sea Drift Riley Kelly Lee

Shika no Tone Shakuhachi Koten Meikyoku Shusei - 2 Yokoyama Katsuya

    This piece has the purpose of representing self-discipline. A very fast tempo and violent breathing indicate the manifestations of the mind under strict discipline.


Shingetsu Tajima Tadashi

    Known as Pounding Drum Piece the title conveys the incessant strivings involved in spiritual practice. The fast tempo and forceful breathing is said to indicate manifestations of the mind under strict discipline.

Sokkan Taniguchi Yoshinobu

    The Japanese characters used in writing this title are "utsu" ("to strike") and "nami" ("wave") which represent a continuous pulse expressing persistence.

    The aim or objective in playing this song is to rid oneself of greed, desire and ambition (bad intention). The word "uchi" of "uchi yaburu" comes from the word "ustu". This means to break through the habit of thinking only in a dualistic manner confined to subject and object. "1 (subject) live in this world (object)" is a habitual way of thinking that is born when one is very young and the brain's "gears of duality" begin turning. These opposites of up/down, left/right and in/out are the cubic building blocks of the material world that this mind perceives. It is a quantitative world, thus, the mind creates desires. I want to be big, bigger, biggest and sound loud, louder loudest, etc. One must break through this conditioned way of thinking and existing with the logical mind to experience oneself and the cosmos in a wholesome spiritual manner. The technique of komibuki used here helps one to stay focused and in the moment. It is the persistence of will power that is needed to get beyond unnecessary boundaries.


Tajima Tadashi Shakuhachi no Sekai I Tajima Tadashi

Take Ippon II Yokoyama Katsuya

    Origin unknown. Shirabe (melody) by a mendicant priest standing at a crossroads.


The Voice of Bamboo Steven Taizen Casano

Zen - Katsuya Yokoyama - 02 Yokoyama Katsuya

    This piece has the purpose of representing self-discipline. A very fast tempo and violent breathing indicate the manifestations of the mind under strict discipline.


The International Shakuhachi Society - 2018