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Tsugaru Aiya Bushi

津軽あいや節

This is a piece of genre Min'yo from the Min'yo School.

History (Takahashi Yujiro):

As in Tsugaru Jongara Bushi, an improvised shamisen opening leads to the melismatic main song. The trickily elusive, uneven pulse suits the song's frequent function accompanying a bouncing solo dance. "Yosare Bushi" and "Jongara Bushi" are other favorite Tsugaru songs.

aiya na
Aiya, you can hear a song, a Tsugaru song: "Yosare", "Jongara", Aiya Bushi".
This evening, how auspicious appears the flowery bride.
Her parents, gazing on in enraptured admiration, cry tears of happiness.

Tsugaru Aiya Bushi appears on the following albums

AlbumShakuhachiKotoShamisen
Jonkara


Min'yo - Folk Song from Japan - Takahashi Yujiro and friends None

    As in Tsugaru Jongara Bushi, an improvised shamisen opening leads to the melismatic main song. The trickily elusive, uneven pulse suits the song's frequent function accompanying a bouncing solo dance. "Yosare Bushi" and "Jongara Bushi" are other favorite Tsugaru songs.

    Aiya na
    Aiya, you can hear a song, a Tsugaru song: "Yosare", "Jongara", Aiya Bushi".
    This evening, how auspicious appears the flowery bride.
    Her parents, gazing on in enraptured admiration, cry tears of happiness.

    Copyright 1999 - Dr David W. Hughes
    e-mail dh6@soas.ac.uk

Shakuhachi Min'yo


Traditional Music of Japan, The - 03


    Tsugaru Aiya-bushi is the most interesting and representative example of the broad diffusion of folk songs in Japan. Aiya-bushi of Tsugaru, the northern end of Honshu, called Aomori Prefecture today, has its roots in the Aiya-bushi of Kyushu. It was brought to northeast Japan through the Japan Sea. It then spreads to various districts. The basic melodic figures of Aiya-bushi of Aomori and the Aiya-bushi of Nagasaki resemble each other although the text, which is often the case, has been changed.

    Once again this is an example of a Sake party song. It is more rhythmic; than the others, however, and is accompanied by the Shamisen tuned in Niagari and a Taiko.

    The interesting feature of this song is the method of playing the Shamisen which rarely occurs in entire genres of Shamisen music. Contrary to the specific rhythmic figure of the Shamisen, the singing £lows smoothly with frequent melissma slowing the influence of the narrative style of song. After a few stanzas, one of which is recorded here, a fairly long, comical story is sung in a narrative style. The text of this folk song tells about the local life of the district and is sung in colloquial Japanese to a great extent.


The International Shakuhachi Society - 2017