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Yamagoe (aka Reiho)

鈴法

This is a piece of genre Koten from the Dokyoku / Chikushinkai School. Also Known As : Reiho.

History (Tajima Tadashi):

The title may be interpreted as overcoming a difficult task in a less than perfect way. This piece is meant to encourage the overcoming of difficulties.

Yamagoe (aka Reiho) appears on the following albums

AlbumShakuhachiKotoShamisen
Ajikan Taniguchi Yoshinobu

    Sometimes called Yamagoe Reibo, this song is used to set one's standards for training. It was not originally intended as a performance piece. The spiritual practitioner must find the extremes of everything in order to realize a part of oneself that has not as yet been used. In other words, one must push to the threshold of dying during one's training in order to glimpse the self limiting ideas of life/death.

Bamboo In Zen Alcvin Ryuzen Ramos


Empty Sky - Yearning for the Bell Volume 3 Riley Kelly Lee

    Yamagoe / Crossing the Mountain is related to Daha in its theme. It is about facing a worthy task and completing it. The 'mountain' that is to be crossed may be that of developing a strong practice of consistent and contemplative meditation.


Home is Now Horacio Curti

Hotchiku (CD) Watazumi Doso Roshi

    Reiho has been transmitted in Hakata's Icchoken temple. Here a strictly faithful rendition of it has been given, expressing a state of purification.

    A 2.6 shaku hocchiku was used for this piece.

In Dead Earnest Ishikawa Toshimitsu

Japan - Splendour of the Shakuhachi Okada Michiaki

    This work comes from Kyushi, the southernmost main island of Japan. The melodic line is filled with angular movement. While the range is a not particularly wide octave and a fifty, the fresh contrasts attributable to the great jumps in the melody, tone colors, and volume leave a bold impression.

Japan - Tajima Tadashi, Master of Shakuhachi Tajima Tadashi

    The title of this piece suggests that even when one has passed the most difficult stage in a piece or work or the most critical stage in an illness, one can never fully relax until one reaches the end or the perfect recovery. This adage applies equally well to Buddhist training in asceticism as well as to study of the shakuhachi. In this recording, the vehement performing style effects a full range of dynamism by means of ever-fluctuating and fully ornamented melodic movements within a relatively narrow and low tessitura.

Japanese Traditional Shakuhachi Yokoyama Katsuya

    Kyushu district origin. Has an angular melodic line. Full of lively motion.

Japon - Musique Millenaire Yokoyama Katsuya

    Originaire de Kyushu, ce morceau exprime l'identité de l'homme avec la nature. II suggère l'assaut furieux des vagues se brisant contre les rochers de la grève.

Japon L'art du shakuhachi Yokoyama Katsuya

    Reiho (Bell Of The Buddhist Law)

    The title "Reiho" seems to be drawn from the legend according to which the monk Fuke, who founded the sect of the same name, used to beg while reciting Buddhist sutras, which he punctuated by ringing a small bell. However, there exist several "Reiho" pieces, such as "Igusa-reiho", “Izu-reiho", "Oshu-reiho", etc., and they are fairly different from one another. The piece which is played on this disc belongs to the repertoire which was handed down by the Fuke monks of Northern Kyushu. This "Reiho", composed of three parts, is characterised by the use of irregular blowing, or, muraiki.

Katsuya Yokoyama Plays Shakuhachi - 1 Yokoyama Katsuya

    Kyushu district origin. Has an angular melodic line. Full of lively motion.

Koten Shakuhachi Kakizakai Kaoru

    Transmitted in the Kyushu area, this piece is characterized by strong musical transitions and concentrated, palpitating energy. How much energy can I put into this music? If either, technique, concentration or physical strength is lacking, failure will result.


Marco Lienhard - Shakuhachi Marco Lienhard


Shakuhachi - Clive Bell Clive Bell

    Spiritual Law

Shakuhachi - Ryudo - 02 Takahashi Ryudo


Shakuhachi - The Art of Yokoyama Katsuya Yokoyama Katsuya

    This is an example of koten honkyoku that was handed down by many komuso in the Kyusyu region. Because of sketchy historical records, it is impossible to be sure if this piece originated in a komuso temple in Hakata (a city in northern Kyusyu) by the name of Itchoken, but one can clearly hear the vestiges of the komuso who used Ittyoken as a base for their wanderings in and around the Kyusyu area.

    In the old Kyusyu region, there was a tune called "Sashi", which was a type 'nagash', a piece that would be played as a komuso collected alms. (There are various ways to read each of the two Chinese characters that from the word "Sashi,"). Also, there are many musical variations of "Sashi," long and short and among the longer ones, there are types which include a particular phrase called "yamagoe no te". This piece, known as "Yamagoe," is clearly one of these. Incidentally, a well-known piece called "Ajikan" is also derived from "Sashi" but does not contain this particular phrase, "Yamagoe no te" is the very short modulating passage of G, F, D-flat, C which is played against the basic progression of A-flat, G, E-flat, D. The opening melody is a characteristic one which resembles "Ajikan," and lively shakuhachi phrasing can be heard throughout the piece. Listen carefully to identify the above phrase.

Shakuhachi Suiso Furuya Teruo

Shika no Tone Shakuhachi Koten Meikyoku Shusei - 1 Yokoyama Katsuya

    (Going over the mountain)

    Yamagoe literally means, going over a mountain, and is interpreted in Japanese as, overcoming the most difficult part of a task in some way or other, which is not a perfect accomplishment because of some possible lack of care.

    This piece is meant to encourage the overcoming of difficulties.


Shingetsu Tajima Tadashi

    The title may be interpreted as overcoming a difficult task in a less than perfect way. This piece is meant to encourage the overcoming of difficulties.


Tajima Tadashi Shakuhachi no Sekai I Tajima Tadashi

Tamuke Taniguchi Yoshinobu

    Sometimes called Yamagoe Reibo, this song is used to set one's standards for training. It was not originally intended as a performance piece. The practitioner must find the extremes of everything in order to realize a part of oneself that hasn't as yet been used. In other words, one must push to the threshold of dying during one's training in order to glimpse the self limiting ideas of life/death.


The Voice of Bamboo Steven Taizen Casano

Watazumido-so Roshi Watazumi Doso Roshi


World of Zen Music, The - Shakuhachi Music from Kyushu Nakamura Akikazu

    This piece is known also under the titles Shin no saji, Reibo and Reiho. It is one of the three pieces based on the piece Saji, and is the most orthodox and least ornamented of the three.

Zen - Katsuya Yokoyama - 01 Yokoyama Katsuya

    (Going over the mountain)

    Yamagoe literally means, going over a mountain, and is interpreted in Japanese as, overcoming the most difficult part of a task in some way or other, which is not a perfect accomplishment because of some possible lack of care.

    This piece is meant to encourage the overcoming of difficulties.


The International Shakuhachi Society - 2017