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Yugure no Kyoku

夕暮の曲

This is a piece of genre Koten from the Kinko Ryû - 琴古流 School.

History (John Singer):

This is an original piece of Ichigetsu-Ji Temple (the main Fuke Shu temple of Edo). Kinko Kurosawa I took this music and added it into his repertoire of Honkyoku pieces. Today "Yugure No Kyoku" cannot be found in other Shakuhachi schools.

It is said that this is one of the rare poetic pieces of the Kinko Ryu Honkyoku and that its melody is very emotional in nature

Yugure no Kyoku appears on the following albums

AlbumShakuhachiKotoShamisen
Aki no Yugure (Autumn Dusk) Kurahashi Yodo II

Castles In the Sky Allen Nyoshin Steir

Complete Collection of Honkyoku from the Kinko School - Vol 2 - Disc 3 Aoki Reibo II


Flute of the Misty Sea, The Andreas Fuyu Gutzwiller

    This is one of the programmatic pieces, which are not part of the religious tradition of the Kinko school. The title means "a piece for the evening dusk". According to a legend it was inspired by the sound if the evening bell of the Chion temple in Kyoto. Kurosawa Kinko had learned this piece from the Priest Hanrin at the Ichigetsu temple.

Grand Masters of the Shakuhachi Flute Yamaguchi Goro

    The title means "the Tune of Evening". It is said that this piece was composed from the musical impresions of the evening bell of Chi-On-In, a famous temple in Kyoto. There are some sections which suggest the sounds of the temple bell. This is an artistic music and not of religious use.

Jin Nyodo No Shakuhachi 04 Jin Nyodo

Kinko Ryu Honkyoku - 7 Aoki Reibo II

Kinko Ryu Shakuhachi - Koten Honkyoku - Kindai Shakuhachi Gaku Yamaguchi Goro

Kinko Ryu Shakuhachi Honkyoku Notomi Judo I


Makoto Shinjitsu - with a heart of true sincerity Ronnie Nyogetsu Reishin Seldin

    Yugure no Kyoku is also a Kinko-ryu Honkyoku, and literally means "the evening bell". The bell which this composition refers to is that of Chio-in Temple in Kyoto. The bell is very famous for being rung on New Year's eve every year. It is rung 108 times, to rid humanity of its 108 sins.


Meditative Shakuhachi Solos Daniel Nyohaku Soergel

Prayer for the Missing, A Daniel Nyohaku Soergel

Shakuhachi - Ryudo - 02 Takahashi Ryudo


Shakuhachi Bell John Singer

    This title means the tune of evening or Twilight Bell. It is said that this piece was composed from musical impressions of the evening bell of Chi-On-In, a famous temple in Kyoto. There are numerous sections which suggest the sounds of the temple bell. This piece is one of the rare poetic Honkyoku pieces having a melody which is very emotional in nature.

Shakuhachi Meijin Sen Yamaguchi Goro


Shakuhachi Meijin Sen 39 Yamaguchi Goro

Shakuhachi no Shinzui-Shakuhachi Honkyoku - 05 Yamaguchi Goro

Sui Zen - Blowing Meditation on the Shakuhachi - 04 Ronnie Nyogetsu Reishin Seldin

    The title, Yugure No Kyoku, means tune of the evening, or "sunset piece." It provides a musical impression of
    the sound of the Evening Bell of the Chio-In (or Chioin) Temple in Kyoto, expressing the komuso's solitary nature with no wife, no children, and no thoughts.

    The bell at Chio-In is traditionally rung 108 times on New Year's Eve, to ring out the 108 sins of mankind.

    The writing on the left of Kurahashi Yodo' s transcribed sheet music indicates that this piece was written in Kyoto, but there are conflicting thoughts about whether it was actually from Tokyo. Kinko Kurasawa supposedly got his version from the priest Hanrin at Ichigetsu Ji Temple, which was the main Fuke Shu temple in Edo, the city that now is Tokyo.

    The origin of the piece could be important because traditionally, honkyoku from Kyoto are played using traditional forms; pieces from Tokyo can use more "modem" sounds.

    The piece has a melancholy feeling until the high notes are reached. We can assume that this depicts transcendence of the world's sins. Although this piece has a religious theme, it was actually performed for entertainment, not meditation.

Wind in the Reeds Ronnie Nyogetsu Reishin Seldin

    The title of this honkyoku means "Evening Song", and the music describes the slow, rolling sound of the famous bell at Chioin Temple of Kyoto, as is heard at the end of the day.

Zen Music - III Yamaguchi Goro

    The title means 'the Tune of Evening." It is said that this piece was composed form the musical impressions of the evening bell of Chi-On-In, a famous temple in Kyoto. There are some sections which suggest the sounds of the temple bell. This is an artistic music and not of religious use.


Zen Music with Ancient Shakuhachi - Disc 1 John Singer

    (Twilight Bell) This is an original piece of Ichigetsu-ji Temple (the main Fuke Sect temple of Edo). Kinko Kurosawa (founder of the Kinko Ryu) took this music and added it into his repertoire. Yugure No Kyoku is one of the rare poetic Honkyoku of the Kinko Ryu and its melody is very emotional in nature.


The International Shakuhachi Society - 2017