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Tamuke

手向

This is a piece of genre Koten from the Dokyoku / Chikushinkai School.

History (Michael Chikuzen Gould):

This is a requiem piece. Several melodies sad, but friendly or approachable are played around a familiar lullaby.

Tamuke appears on the following albums

AlbumShakuhachiKotoShamisen
Ajikan Taniguchi Yoshinobu

    "Tamuke" literally means "hands folded together in prayer" and is a eulogy or requiem for the departed souls of loved ones. It is a melody that brings indescribable sorrow and stillness deep into the heart. Tamuke originated in the Fusai Temple in Ise, Wakayama Prefecture, a branch of the Kyoto Meian Temple. Let's look at the image of a person sitting in prayer, facing. . . what? Facing the unknown. Someone special and dearly loved has crossed over to the other side. You are communicating with them, however, your mind faces "nothing". You expect them to walk through the door any minute, but they do not. They have vanished from the face of the earth. The rational mind cannot deal with this very well. We sit in an attitude of respect for both the deceased and in the face of the unknown. When one goes through this "tearing away" that occurs when someone who is a part of your life dies, a wide range of emotions are experienced: pain, anger, fear, sadness, bewilderment, hope, expectation, helplessness, grief, and so on. Tamuke gives us a vehicle to express these deep feelings and a way to communicate with our loved ones.

    In Japan, most homes have a Buddhist altar where one can sit and connect with those who have passed on from this world. Often there is a photograph of the deceased in front of the altar as well as some food or drink they enjoyed. One sits at the altar, burning incense and communicating in some form, usually by chanting a sutra, by talking or even in the silence of memories. This is wonderful because, in Japan, there is a place to make such contact in a most natural way.

    A shakuhachi player can sit in this space before the altar playing Tamuke until the person in his or her heart appears. Time is not part of this world; one should naturally lose oneself in this process and several hours will pass in an instant. Play shakuhachi to express the emotions you experience at the gates of death. Play while remembering the things you experienced with this person, recalling their existence as if you are sharing old stories with them. Play until tears of sadness stream down your cheeks, then tears of happiness, as you feel their presence sitting next to you and the relief that they still have an existence, albeit in a different world.

    The feeling of Tamuke is whatever you bring to it. Not just a sad effigy, but something very real as you play from your life experience. Do what is natural. Play happily if you feel like doing so; this is a private matter. Tamuke gives an opportunity to play from the core of your life. This skill cannot be taught, but only learned through "doing".


Breath-Sight - Yearning for the Bell Volume 1 Riley Kelly Lee

    Prayer for Safe Passage

    The term tamuke refers to making spiritual offerings to the Buddha. Originating from the Ise district of Japan, tamuke combines the elements of the requiem and the elegy of Western music. It is a prayer for safe passage through life and through death. Played on a 2.6 shaku flute.

Empty Bells Riley Kelly Lee


Esprit d'Orient Yokoyama Katsuya


Floating Clouds Michael Chikuzen Gould

    This is a requiem piece. Several melodies sad, but friendly or approachable are played around a familiar lullaby.

Floating Clouds (Larry Tyrrell) Larry Tyrrell

His Practical Philosophy - 1


Hotchiku (CD) Watazumi Doso Roshi

    ("Offering")

    Tamuke gives the feeling of old Nara, which is where this piece comes from. It is meant to be played for and in front of people.

    A 2.55 shaku hocchiku was used for this piece.


Ichi Horacio Curti

    Symbolized with the gesture of putting the palms together in front of the chest, this piece is traditionally performed both at funerals and memorials for the deceased.

In Dead Earnest Ishikawa Toshimitsu

Japanese Bamboo Flute Richard Stagg

Japanese Folk Songs


    A song for solo, offering to a soul. Music of the spiritual world which is the essence of the Shakuhachi (Japanese bamboo flute).

Japanese Traditional Shakuhachi Yokoyama Katsuya

    Ise district origin. Combines the elements of requiem and elegy of the Western music.

Japon - Musique Millenaire Yokoyama Katsuya

    Elégie ou requiem, cette oeuvre exprime la communion avec un être cher décédé. Très anci.enne, elle est née dans la région d 'Ise.

Japon L'art du shakuhachi Yokoyama Katsuya

    Tamuke (Offertory)

    "Tamuke" belongs to the pieces with a liturgical function, "Confession", "Prayer", "Devotion", "Incense-burning", etc. It is played either at funerals, or on the occasion of the commemorative ceremonies for the dead, in order to create a moment of contemplation and peace.

Koten Shakuhachi Kakizakai Kaoru

    From Ise region, Tamuke has meanings of requiem or elegy of Western music and I experience the calm graciousness of abundant forgiveness.

Kyorei Tokuyama Takashi

    Although the composer is unknown, Tamuke comes from the city of Suzuka in Mie Prefecture. More specifically, we can say this piece originates from the temple of Fusaiji, which has preserved such honkyoku as Kakusuirei and Sakigake-no-kyoku. By using a melodic system of whole steps built around a minor scale, Tamuke creates a sublime and melancholic sentiment. It has a modern feeling and is ever reminiscent of Japanese Enka music.


Marco Lienhard - Shakuhachi Marco Lienhard

November Steps - Take no Miryoku Yokoyama Ranpo

Sea Drift Riley Kelly Lee

Shakuhachi - Ryudo - 02 Takahashi Ryudo


Shakuhachi - The Art of Yokoyama Katsuya Yokoyama Katsuya

    In Japanese language, 'tamuke' means to make offerings to Gods Buddha or the dead, or simply the offered things themselves. This piece was played by komuso, literally as 'tamuke' to the dead. Even nowadays, it is sometimes played in this way.

    In koten honkyoku there are other types of religious repertoire played in specific ceremonies, "Shokomon", "Zangemon", "Kuyo no kyoku", "Eko" etc., as well as "Tamuke." though it is rather a short piece, it is well organized as a tune, and a formidable masterpiece. The melody, carrying sorrow in its stillness contains love and grief to the dead and pull delicately at the listener's heart.


Shakuhachi Honkyoku Riley Kelly Lee


Shakuhachi Ma Todd Barton

Shika no Tone Shakuhachi Koten Meikyoku Shusei - 1 Yokoyama Katsuya

    (Offering)

    The meaning of Tamuke is an offering to the gods or to the Buddha. This piece is played during the Buddhist service for the dead.


Shingetsu Tajima Tadashi


Smithsonian Folkways - Shakuhachi Honkyoku Riley Kelly Lee

Sound of Zen, The Okuda Atsuya


Tajima Tadashi Shakuhachi no Sekai I Tajima Tadashi

Tamuke Taniguchi Yoshinobu

    "Tamuke" literally means "hands folded together in prayer" and is a eulogy or requiem for the departed souls of loved ones. It is a melody that brings indescribable sorrow and stillness deep into the heart. Tamuke originated in the Fusai Temple in Ise, Wakayama Prefecture, a branch of the Kyoto Meian Temple.

    Let's look at the image of a person sitting in prayer, facing. . . what? Facing the unknown. Someone special and dearly loved has crossed over to the other side. You are communicating with them, however, your mind faces "nothing". You expect them to walk through the door any minute, but they do not. They have vanished from the face of the earth. The rational mind cannot deal with this very well. We sit in an attitude of respect for both the deceased and in the face of the unknown. When one goes through this "tearing away" that occurs when someone who is a part of your life dies, a wide range of emotions are experienced: pain, anger, fear, sadness, bewilderment, hope, expectation, helplessness, grief, and so on. Tamuke gives us a vehicle to express these deep feelings and a way to communicate with our loved ones.

    In Japan, most homes have a Buddhist altar where one can sit and connect with those who have passed on from this world. Often there is a photograph of this person in front of the altar as well as some food or drink they enjoyed. One sits at the altar, burning incense and communicating in some form, usually by chanting a sutra, by talking or even in the silence of memories. This is wonderful because, in Japan, there is a place to make such contact in a most natural way.

    A shakuhachi player can sit in this space before the altar playing Tamuke until the person in his or her heart appears. Time is not part of this world; one should naturally lose oneself in this process and several hours will pass in an instant. Play shakuhachi to express the emotions you experience at the gates of death. Play while remembering the things you experienced with this person, recalling their existence as if you are sharing old stories with them. Play until tears of sadness stream down your cheeks, then tears of happiness, as you feel their presence sitting next to you and the relief that they still have an existence, albeit in a different world.

    The feeling of Tamuke is whatever you bring to it. Not just a sad effigy, but something very real as you play from your life experience. Do what is natural. Play happily if you feel like doing so; this is a private matter. Tamuke gives an opportunity to play from the core of your life. This skill cannot be taught, but only learned through "doing".


Traditional Japanese Music Iwamoto Yoshikazu

    Tamuke - offering

    Originally coming from Ise province in central Japan, the piece engenders the warm and serene atmosphere of that area by its simple and much loved melody.

When the Brightness Comes Iwamoto Yoshikazu

    Originally coming from Ise province in central Japan, the piece engenders the warm and serene atmosphere of that area by its simple and much loved melody.

Zen - Katsuya Yokoyama - 01 Yokoyama Katsuya

    (Offering)

    The meaning of Tamuke is an offering to the gods or to the Buddha. This piece is played during the Buddhist service for the dead.


The International Shakuhachi Society - 2014