International Shakuhachi Society Logo

The International Shakuhachi Society

Igusa Reibo

葦草鈴慕

This is a piece of genre Koten in the style of Takuhatsu from the Chikuho Ryû and Kinko Ryû - 琴古流 Schools .

History (John Singer):

Igusa Reibo is the Reibo piece of Reiho-Ji Temple which was located in Musashi No Kuni Kawagoe, Igusa-Mura (1532 - 1613). This piece was transmitted to the Kinko school along with the piece "Izu Reibo".

Igusa Reibo appears on the following albums

AlbumShakuhachiKotoShamisen
Complete Collection of Honkyoku from the Kinko School - Vol 2 - Disc 4 Aoki Reibo II


Flute of the Misty Sea, The Andreas Fuyu Gutzwiller

    Little is known about the origin of this piece. Kurosawa Kinko had learned it from the priest Yuko who seems to have helped him with the compilation of the 36 honkyoku. Igusa is some sort of reed, Reibo designates a high rank among the pieces of the Kinko school.

Grand Masters of the Shakuhachi Flute Yamaguchi Goro

    Igusa, or the rush is a plant which tatami, Japanese mattings, are made of. This piece comes from Reihoji, a temple in Ome near Tokyo, which was one of the headquarters of komuso. According to the tradition, a komuso belonging to this temple composed the present piece developing an inspiration which had been given to hime while going through a rush field. Among the religious shakuhachi music of the Fukeshu there are many that bear titles containing reibo at the end. Its literal meaning is "the yearning for the bell"". Tradition says that Fuke Zenji, the founder of the Fukeshu, used to ring a bell in his hands when he walked around the streets to propagate. So, reibo was used at first in remembrance of the founder of the sect. But, later, they came to use it very commonly in the titles, the original significance being lost gradually.

Kinko Ryu Honkyoku - 8 Aoki Reibo II

Kinko Ryu Shakuhachi Koten Honkyoku Yes

Shakuhachi no Shinzui-Shakuhachi Honkyoku - 07 Yamaguchi Goro

Zen Music - IV Yamaguchi Goro

    Igusa or the rush is a plant which tatami, Japanese mattings, are made of. This piece comes from Reihoji, a temple in Ome near Tokyo, which was one of the headquarters of komuso. According to the tradition, a komuso belonging to this temple composed the present piece developing an inspiration which had been given him while going through a rush field. Among the religious shakuhachi musics of the Fukeshu there are many that bear titles containing reibo at the end. Its literal meaning is 'the yearning for the bell.' Tradition says that Fuke Zenji, the founder of Fukeshu, used to ring a bell in his hand when he walked around the streets to propagate. So, reibo was used at first in remembrance of the founder of the sect. But, later, they came to use it very commonly in the titles the original significance being lost gradually.


The International Shakuhachi Society - 2017