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Kyôsôteki Nijûsô

協奏的二重奏

This is a piece of genre Modern. This piece was composed for Shakuhachi by the person Irino Yoshiro in 1969/08. This piece was composed for Koto by the person Irino Yoshiro in the year 1969/08.

History (Aoki Reibo II):

Composed in August, 1969. Originally performed on 14th November, 1969 at Tokyo Dai-ichi Seimei Hall at Shizuo (now Reibo) Aoki's solo concert by Shizuo Reibo's shakuhachi and Tadao Sawai's koto.

This tune was composed without being too sensible of the traditional side of the instruments shakuhachi and koto. It is composed with the free use of the twelve-tone technique.

This tune has a song, a poem and a novel. It has charm and tenderness, elasticity and toughness. It is a drama of eight minutes. An epitome of life. It is also a tune that has first clearly shown double stopping by shakuhachi.

(played with an Itshaku-hassun-kan).

Kyôsôteki Nijûsô appears on the following albums

AlbumShakuhachiKotoShamisen
Challenging Eternity Disk 19


Hibiki - Contemporary Music for Japanese Traditional Instruments - 2 Aoki Reibo II Sawai Tadao
Musiques de l'Asie Traditionnelle Vol 20 Japon - The Shakuhachi of Reibo Aoki Aoki Reibo II Fukunaga Chieko
    Composed in August, 1969. Originally performed on 14th November, 1969 at Tokyo Dai-ichi Seimei Hall at Shizuo (now Reibo) Aoki's solo concert by Shizuo Reibo's shakuhachi and Tadao Sawai's koto.

    This tune was composed without being too sensible of the traditional side of the instruments shakuhachi and koto. It is composed with the free use of the twelve-tone technique.

    This tune has a song, a poem and a novel. It has charm and tenderness, elasticity and toughness. It is a drama of eight minutes. An epitome of life. It is also a tune that has first clearly shown double stopping by shakuhachi.

    (played with an Itshaku-hassun-kan).

Sounds from Japan Yokoyama Katsuya

    Koto and Shakuhachi contain, at the core of their tone quality and playing technique, the fundamental elements of the Japanese ear for music. When I wrote this music, I tried not to indulge myself in the Japanese elements. It might have destroyed the world peculiar to Koto and Shakuhachi, or might have created some new world. I hoped, of course, to give birth to something new. The two instruments stimulate each other to produce new themes one after another, until they quietly return to the first theme to end the music. This work was composed at the request of Japan Broadcasting Corporation in 1969, and first performed by Reibo Aoki and Tadao Sawai in the same year. (Yoshiro Irino)


The International Shakuhachi Society - 2017